ASSESSING THE ROLE OF THE FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREEN IN INJURY PREVENTION AND HOW TECHNOLOGY CAN ENHANCE ITS USE IN APPLIED SETTINGS

Smith, Paul (2018) ASSESSING THE ROLE OF THE FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREEN IN INJURY PREVENTION AND HOW TECHNOLOGY CAN ENHANCE ITS USE IN APPLIED SETTINGS. Doctoral thesis, Waterford Institute of Technology.

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Abstract

The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) assesses an individual’s mobility, stability and flexibility to identify any weaknesses or asymmetries that may exist. Research has considered if it can predict injury and performance, with inconclusive results. Reliability is high for total FMS scores, but decreases significantly for subtest scores. Study one assessed whether the FMS could accurately predict injury rates and performance in 116 soccer players (mean age=23.2±4.4 years). Players undertook the FMS and performance tests, and injury occurrence was tracked throughout one season. Results showed a cut-off score of 14 or less could not predict a player’s risk of all injuries (odds ratio=1.01), or non-contact injuries (odds ratio=0.63), but was significantly linked to vertical jump height (p=0.006). Additional studies discussed the development and validation of novel software to automatically assess the FMS. Study two assessed the software’s validity and test-retest reliability when scoring the deep squat (DS). Two validation sessions were completed. Initially, 141 participants (mean age=9.7±3.7 years) performed the DS three times, before 16 participants (mean age=29.8±8.1 years) performed the DS on two occasions, 72 hours apart. Results showed the software had good agreement (87.5%) and moderate correlation (rs=0.44) with manual scoring and had moderate test-retest reliability (ICC=0.74). Study three developed the software to assess three FMS subtests. Validation involved 27 participants (mean age=19.8± 3.8 years) performing each subtest three times, with the software showing good mean agreement (87.3%), and inter-rater reliability (Κw=0.76), and strong correlation (rs=0.76), with live manual scoring. The final study assessed the software’s validity and test-retest reliability compared to manual scoring for all seven subtests. Twenty-three participants (mean age=22.8±5.3 years) completed all seven FMS subtests. The software’s mean agreement (87.5%) with live and video manual scoring was good, and a strong mean correlation was also reported (rs=0.71), for the seven subtests. Mean test-retest reliability was good across all seven FMS subtests (ICC=0.96). Overall, this body of research suggests the FMS cannot accurately be used to predict injury or performance in soccer players, but the development of novel software has provided a valid alternative to manual assessment for certain FMS subtests, which could provide benefits for its use in applied settings.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Injury prevention
Departments or Groups: *NONE OF THESE*
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Health, Sport and Exercise Studies
Depositing User: Derek Langford
Date Deposited: 30 Nov 2018 15:10
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2019 11:33
URI: http://repository.wit.ie/id/eprint/3308

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