Characterisation of dry powder inhaler formulations using atomic force microscopy

Weiss, Cordula and McLoughlin, Peter and Cathcart, Helen (2015) Characterisation of dry powder inhaler formulations using atomic force microscopy. Characterisation of dry powder inhaler formulations using atomic force microscopy.

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Abstract

Inhalation formulations are a popular way of treating the symptoms of respiratory diseases. The active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) is delivered directly to the site of action within the deep lung using an inhalation device such as the dry powder inhaler (DPI). The performance of the formulation and the efficiency of the treatment depend on a number of factors including the forces acting between the components. In DPI formulations these forces are dominated by interparticulate interactions. Research has shown that adhesive and cohesive forces depend on a number of particulate properties such as size, surface roughness, crystallinity, surface energetics and combinations of these. With traditional methods the impact of particulate properties on interparticulate forces could be evaluated by examining the bulk properties. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), however, enables the determination of local surface characteristics and the direct measurement of interparticulate forces using the colloidal probe technique. AFM is considered extremely useful for evaluating the surface topography of a substrate (an API or carrier particle) and even allows the identification of crystal faces, defects and polymorphs from high-resolution images. Additionally, information is given about local mechanical properties of the particles and changes in surface composition and energetics. The assessment of attractive forces between two bodies is possible by using colloidal probe AFM. This review article summarises the application of AFM in DPI formulations while specifically focussing on the colloidal probe technique and the evaluation of interparticulate forces.

Item Type: Article
Departments or Groups: Pharmaceutical and Molecular Biotechnology Research Centre
Divisions: School of Science > Department of Chemical and Life Sciences
SWORD Depositor: Cordula Weiss
Depositing User: Cordula Weiss
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2018 13:08
Last Modified: 31 May 2022 09:12
URI: http://repository.wit.ie/id/eprint/3286

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